Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Rammstein’ Category

[POSTPONED: April 17, 2021] Ministry / KMFDM / Front Line Assembly [rescheduled from July 18, 2020; moved to October 17, 2021]

indexThis show was moved to April which seemed reasonable at the time.  I see now that it has been pushed back to October which actually seems optimistic.  I am very bummed to see that KMFDM is no longer on the tour, as They would have been a great opener.  I like Helmet, but I think KMFDM would have been more fun.  If I’m going to one of these two shows (Montclair being the other one) it would certainly Montclair.

I’ve been a fan of Ministry for decades.  I even liked the first album With Sympathy (and listen to it now more than their hardercore stuff).  But when Land of Rape and Honey came out, it was the most intense thing in the world. It was incredible.

They put out a series of great heavy albums, although by 1999’s Filth Pig either I stopped enjoying it or they just weren’t as good.

So I guess it has been two decades since I cared about Ministry.  However, Al Jourgensen and his band keep touring and, since I’ve seen Slayer now, I thought I should see what a ministry experience is like.

I wanted to go to their show in 2018, (I was really interested in seeing opening band Igorr) but the date just didn’t work for me.

Although I hadn’t yet gotten tickets for this show, I was looking forward to this retro bill.

I liked KMFDM more in theory than actually listening to them–I have one album I think). But I always appreciated them (especially the joke that their initials stand for Kill Mother Fucking Depeche Mode–actually it is Kein Mehrheit Für Die Mitleid, “no pity for the majority”).  Only one guy is still in the band, but I’d be curious to see what their proto-Rammstein show would be like.

Front Line Assembly was one of the few bands on the industrial label Waxtrax that I never really got into.  I liked many bands on the label, but really never had much exposure to FLA (in the days before you could listen to things online).   I’m curious what 1980s industrial music sounds like in 2020.

Now that I see that the show is also going to be at the Wellmont Theater in Montclair, I will definitely try to get to that one instead.

Read Full Post »

[POSTPONED: April 16, 2021] Ministry / KMFDM / Helmet / Front Line Assembly [rescheduled from July 18, 2020; moved to October 16, 2021]

indexThis show was moved to April which seemed reasonable at the time.  I see now that it has been pushed back to October which actually seems optimistic.  I am very bummed to see that KMFDM is no longer on the tour, as They would have been a great opener.  I like Helmet, but I think KMFDM would have been more fun.  If I’m going to one of these two shows (Philly the other one) it would certainly be this one.

I’ve been a fan of Ministry for decades.  I even liked the first album With Sympathy (and listen to it now more than their hardercore stuff).  But when Land of Rape and Honey came out, it was the most intense thing in the world. It was incredible.

They put out a series of great heavy albums, although by 1999’s Filth Pig either I stopped enjoying it or they just weren’t as good.

So I guess it has been two decades since I cared about Ministry.  However, Al Jourgensen and his band keep touring and, since I’ve seen Slayer now, I thought I should see what a ministry experience is like.

I wanted to go to their show in 2018, (I was really interested in seeing opening band Igorr) but the date just didn’t work for me.

Although I hadn’t yet gotten tickets for this show, I was looking forward to this retro bill.

I liked KMFDM more in theory than actually listening to them–I have one album I think). But I always appreciated them (especially the joke that their initials stand for Kill Mother Fucking Depeche Mode–actually it is Kein Mehrheit Für Die Mitleid, “no pity for the majority”).  Only one guy is still in the band, but I’d be curious to see what their proto-Rammstein show would be like.

Front Line Assembly was one of the few bands on the industrial label Waxtrax that I never really got into.  I liked many bands on the label, but really never had much exposure to FLA (in the days before you could listen to things online).   I’m curious what 1980s industrial music sounds like in 2020.

Now that I see that the show is also going to be at the Wellmont Theater in Montclair, I will definitely try to get to that one instead.

Read Full Post »

[POSTPONED: July 18, 2020] Ministry / KMFDM / Front Line Assembly [moved to April 17, 2021 and also April 16 at Wellmont Theater]

indexI’ve been a fan of Ministry for decades.  I even liked the first album With Sympathy (and listen to it now more than their hardercore stuff).  But when Land of rape and Honey came out, it was the most intense thing in the world. It was incredible.

They put out a series of great heavy albums, although by 1999’s Filth Pig either I stopped enjoying it or they just weren’t as good.

So I guess it has been two decades since I cared about Ministry.  However, Al Jourgensen and his band keep touring and, since I’ve seen Slayer now, I thought I should see what a ministry experience is like.

I wanted to go to their show in 2018, (I was really interested in seeing opening band Igorr) but the date just didn’t work for me.

Although I hadn’t yet gotten tickets for this show, I was looking forward to this retro bill.

I liked KMFDM more in theory than actually listening to them–I have one album I think). But I always appreciated them (especially the joke that their initials stand for Kill Mother Fucking Depeche Mode–actually it is Kein Mehrheit Für Die Mitleid, “no pity for the majority”).  Only one guy is still in the band, but I’d be curious to see what their proto-Rammstein show would be like.

Front Line Assembly was one of the few bands on the industrial label Waxtrax that I never really got into.  I liked many bands on the label, but really never had much exposure to FLA (in the days before you could listen to things online).   I’m curious what 1980s industrial music sounds like in 2020.

Now that I see that the show is also going to be at the Wellmont Theater in Montclair, I will definitely try to get to that one instead.

Read Full Post »

wwiSOUNDTRACK: LAIBACH-Let It Be (1988).

220px-LaibachletitbeBecause Let It Be doesn’t end with The Beatles.  In 1988, Laibach, the Slovenian industrial band covered the entire Let It Be album (except for the title song).  Laibach are something of a proto-Rammstein, full of bombast and loud voices, stomping beats and despite the Slovakian heritage, a very Teutonic feel.

Opening with “Get Back,” the song is a stomping industrial march.  The lead singer (I have no idea who the members even are, as they don’t say much about themselves on the record).  I’ve always enjoyed this version, and I kind of assumed that the whole album would be similarly bombastic.

However, after the bombast of the first song, “Two of Us” opens with a crooning voice singing a long.  It’s a nice change.  The music is industrial and loud–but the keyboard riff is also cool. and different.  Most of the songs are unrecognizable as the original, but I think “Dig a Pony” may be the most unlike the original.  The chorus melody is very different and I barely recognized it.  The high notes of “because” are done in a low bass spoken word.  It’s quite a change.

“Across the Universe” is genuinely pretty with two female singers and a harpsichord.  “I Me Mine” has very similar vocals although the music is very different–with strings and stomping drums.  “Dig It” is a nonsense song on the original, but Laibach have a fun (if that’s the word) making it more of a real song with lots of shouting.  “Maggie Mae” is a folks song that The Beatles recorded.  Laibach call it “Maggie Mae” but instead record tradition German songs “Auf der Lüneburger Heide” & “Was gleicht wohl auf Erden.”

“I’ve got a Feeling” is done like a rally.  There is cheering and shouting and the lyrics are delivered in a dramatic spoken word (complete with Oh Yeahs).  The audience cheers and responds.  After nearly 4 minutes, the cheering continues, but they throw in a steel drum melody of “The Long and Winding Road” (I wondered how they would handle that pretty song).

I don’t really like the original of “1 after 909” but I like the way this one is done.  It’s very heavy and rocking with some crazy guitar solos and a refrain of “Smoke on the Water.”  “For You Blue” is transformed into an stomping synth version with the vocal melody popping up during the synth line.  After 4 minutes of the song, there’s a circus-like rendition of the melody to end the disc.

This is a vastly different rendition of the Beatles album, one that many people will find unpleasant, but I actually knew this version before the original and it will always be fun to me.  It’s also interesting how 20 years later, Rammstein would become very successful performing a very similar style of music.

[READ: February 10, 2015] The First World War A|Z

Sarah and I had recently begin watching Downton Abbey (I know, only four years late).  During the season that focuses on World War I, I realized that I was woefully ignorant about details of this war.  I’m also surprised there hasn’t been more made of its centennial–I’m sure a bigger deal was made in Britain.  At the same time, I saw this book at work and it seemed like a good way for me to fill in the gaps.

I am amused and confused that the subtitle says “from assassination to zeppelin” when in fact it is actually from “ace to zeppelin” but I guess assassination is more catchy?

Anyhow, this book was put together by the Imperial War Museum, the British Museum which was founded while the war was underway–such was the significance and unprecedented nature of the war that it was deemed worthy of having a museum while it was still going on.

This book is basically a tiny encyclopedia about the war written in a imaginable digest sized book.  It’s only 178 pages, so it is perfect for people who want to learn some details without getting terribly bogged down in the trenches (sorry) of the detail. (more…)

Read Full Post »

SOUNDTRACKСУБИТО (Subito)-“Du Hast” (2011).

Субито (pronounced Subito) is from the Ukraine.  They’re a bunch of miners and they play music.  In addition to this cover, which is generating some meme buzz on the internet, they have a few other songs (and videos) of note.

This cover is notable in that the only real difference between this song and the original is the prominence of the button accordion.  The vocals are nearly identical (he’s got his German goth down perfectly), and the rest of the band plays quiet heavily (I love the triangle instruments!).  But the accordion changes the entire texture and tone of the song.   It’s still ominous (I mean, those vocals!) but the accordion adds an air of whimsy that undermines the menace and yet also somehow makes the rest of the song seem even more menacing.

Of course the video is quite silly which leads one to assume that they’re not taking their version too seriously and yet their playing is impeccable and their backing vocals are right on.

So, yes, I rather like this song, and I like being able to include the word Субито in my post.

[READ: November 10, 2011] “The Good Samaritan”

Joyce Carol Oates has a wonderful way of turning her stories into something dark.  Even if it starts out in a rather innocent light.

This story is set in 1981 on a train coming from Utica, NY.  The narrator, Sonia, finds a woman’s wallet stuffed into the seat of the car.  The story begins with Sonia thinking about the woman, wondering what she’s like, looking at the photos of herself and her family and sort of daydreaming what it would be like to be older and married.  It’s only after a brief reverie that she, a poor college student, checks the money to see what’s there.  (About $25).  She hopes that the woman is old enough to give her a reward, but assumes she is not.

Sonia is to be heading home to help her mother with her ailing grandmother, something she’s not looking forward to.  So she decides that she will return the wallet to the woman who, after all, lives only a few blocks from the station.

What is wonderful about this story is that this innocent setup masks the real story, which is never fully explored, but is hinted at enough to keep us all guessing.  When Sonia arrives at the house, the woman’s husband is home and he seems….surprised that Sonia has brought this wallet home.  She feels sympathy for him when he begins to explain that his wife ran off and must have dropped this wallet on this train while she was fleeing.  Sonia wants to help the man in some way.  He invites her inside and she thinks of all the things she could do for him–stupid things like make dinner or maybe even look at her things to see is she can help figure out where her wife went.  She suggests this last idea and he accepts. (more…)

Read Full Post »