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Archive for the ‘Psychometry’ Category

SOUNDTRACKACID MOTHERS TEMPLE & THE MELTING PARAISO U.F.O.-Cometary Orbital Drive (2008).

Cometary Orbital Drive was one of three albums that AMT released in 2008.

It features the same lineup as the other releases around this time.

  • Tsuyama Atsushi – bass, voice, cosmic joker
  • Higashi Hiroshi – synth, guitar, voice, dancin’ king
  • Shimura Koji – drums, Latino cool
  • Kawabata Makoto – guitar, voice, speed guru.

This album has four songs on it although they are more or less variations of the same song.  They released a similar album in 2013 called Cometary Orbital Drive to 2199 which featured about 70 more minutes of variations on this theme.

“Light My Fire Ball” is thirteen minutes long and opens with slow ringing bowls (I assume).  It’s very serene. Then Tsuyama, adds vocal sounds and squeaks and noises.  The band starts playing a groove and Tsuyama sings in an over the top kind of crooning way.  The middle more mellow psychedelia and then it gets wild again with strange vocals noises and weird synth sounds as it segues into track two.

“Planet Billions Of Light-Years Away” is almost 27 minutes long and it introduces the six note melody that will play in one form or another for the next 50 minutes.   As the guitar plays, the synths soar to the heaves and the drums plays a slow beat with lots of hi hat.  It gets slowly faster and faster and then at 10 minutes Kawabata takes off with the start of an interstellar solo. The bass starts meandering and pumping and by14 minutes, the tone of the six note riff changes, becoming more of a lead riff as the song is now propelling pretty quickly.  By 17 minutes you are totally absorbed in this hypnotic melody and then Kawabata takes off with more soloing.   By 25 minutes the song is just soaring away faster than anything–the songs pummels away until the 26 and a half minute marks when the guitar fades out and the synths start until they resume once more in track 3.

After a 30 second intro, the seventeen minute “Circular System 7777777” resumes that same six note melody.  This time slow and ponderous and echoing.  After a few minutes the new beat enters and it’s got a kind of disco feel to it.  The song starts pumping faster for a bit then it slows and picks up once more.  After ten minutes things pause before resuming again, this time more intensely than before.  With four minutes left things start to slow down again and then the guitars fade out and a synth line (and echoing percussion) segues into the final track.

“Milky Way Star” is only 13:32 and it opens with a thunderous snare drum fill and then the fastest rockingest version of the six note riff yet.  Kawabata solos madly, the bass and drums rock out and that riff repeats throughout the track.  The song zooms along getting faster and faster while Kawabata goes nuts. Somehow around 9 minutes they pick up the tempo even faster until around 11 minute when whole things collapses on itself with some wild noise and a new outro guitar riff buried under the chaos.  The chaos clears and the outro riff shines through until it too fades away leaving only a synth chord to show you the way out.

[READ: May 1, 2021] And Then She Vanished

This book came across my desk at work and I thought it sounded really interesting.

When Joseph Bridgeman was young (pre-teen, I believe), he went to a Fun Fair with his sister, Amy.  She encouraged him to try his luck at the rifle range (she wanted to win the big prize).  While Joseph was shooting (and doing very ell), Amy disappeared.

There was no trace of her.

And it has haunted him for his life these last twenty years or so.

I happened to see on the back of the book that this was listed as Joseph Bridgeman Book One.  This made me a little nervous, because while I don’t mind a series, I didn’t want to read a book that finished on a cliffhanger.

Fortunately, this book does not end on a cliff hanger.  Rather, Book Two is set up as a kind of next stage, which makes the story even more intriguing.

So anyhow, Joseph is an antiques dealer and he has the gift of psychometry, which means that he can discover facts about an event or person by touching inanimate objects associated with them.  That’s a pretty good skill to have for an antiques dealer.

But lately he has no motivation to do any work.  He has been plagued by recurring nightmares about his sister.  His mother is suffering from dementia.  His father is not around.   The only help he has is his father’s friend who agreed to look after him and his business.

The friend also encourages Joseph to go to a hypnotherapist.

Having just read the Bernard O’Shea book where he scoffs at Mindfulness (and then winds up embracing it), I was amused to have Joseph Bridgeman also scoff at Mindfulness and then embrace it.

I have to say, if you have psychometry you should be open to hypnotherapy.

Alexia Finch is the hypnotherapist and she is pretty great at it.  He feels comfortable wit her instantly and for the first time in ages he feels relaxed and rested.  He even feels like he went somewhere else while in her office.

When he gets home, he tries some of her relaxation techniques and discovers that he doesn’t fall sleep.  He time travels.  That’s right.  He was thinking about the day and while he was focusing, he wound up appearing a few hours earlier and watched himself come home.

Obviously he is freaked out about this.  And, of course, he knows not to let his earlier self see him, because that’s bad news. (more…)

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